ItÕs A Bird! ItÕs A Plane! (CloseÉ) ItÕs a rocket!

By: MR. E.

Intro

Have you launched a model rocket and are wanting to learn more about rockets? Are you just trying to find out things about them? I hope you find what you are looking for in this report.

Inside Rockets and sizes

This paragraph is about how rockets work:  According to Howstuffworks.com, rockets work using Newton's 3rd law of motion. They push down and go up.  If you were on a scooter and spraying a fire hose forwards, the scooter would go backwards.                  That's how rockets work. (You would be holding on to the scooter, of course, unless you donÕt care about your safety. DonÕt try the scooter thing at home anyway.)

 

Here is the smallest rocket: According to Wikipedia, the rocket "Pegasus" was the smallest satellite rocket.     Its diameter was 1.27 m, its height was 16.9 m, and its mass was 18,500 kg. (That sounds pretty big!)

 

Here is the biggest rocket:  According to Answers.com, the largest rocket was Saturn V. (IÕm pretty sure it went to the moon, though, not Saturn.)

 

Here are the types of rocket fuels: According to Funtrivia.com, There are 2 kinds of rocket fuels: liquid and solid. (I guess that doesnÕt include gas.)  

 

History

This is about the first rockets:  According to NASA, The first rockets were made by the Chinese. They were arrows with tubes on one end.  The tubes were capped on one end and open on the other. They were filled with gunpowder. The arrows/rockets were called "fire-arrows". (Pretty obvious name, huh?)

 

This is about the first rocket that could reach space: According to Answers.com, A German V-2 was the first rocket to reach space. It was a weapon. (I prefer model rockets. TheyÕre way safer, even if they donÕt go outside of the atmosphere.)

 

Other Stuff

This is about what rocketry is:  According to NASA, Rocketry is the science of rockets. (It probably includes Newton's 3rd law.)

 

Conclusion

Did you find what your looking for? I hope so! This is the end of my report.

 

 

Bibliography

 

Bibliography

http://science.howstuffworks.com/rocket.htm

Brain, Marshall

How Rocket Engines Work

January 5, 2011

This talks about, well, how rockets work.

 

Bibliography

http://quest.nasa.gov/space/teachers/rockets/history.html

 

Brief History of Rockets

January 7, 2011

This talks about rocket history, but isn't very "brief".

 

Bibliography

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegasus_(rocket)

 

Pegasus (rocket)

January 10, 2011

This talks about the rocket "Pegasus".

 

Bibliography

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/When_was_the_first_space_rocket_launched

 

When was the first space rocket launched?

January 11, 2011

this doesn't say much.

 

Bibliography

http://science.howstuffworks.com/rocket.htm

Marshall Brain

How rocket engines work

January 5, 2011

This tells about how space shuttles work, how fusion, propulsion will work, and the moon rocket. Very nice pictores. This is my source card, bye.

 

Bibliography

http://science.howstuffworks.com/rocket.htm

tayson, jeff

rockets

January 7, 2011

This article is about some people making a really big rocket.  It tells how it works.  It has pictures. It has videos.  It has advertisements.

 

Bibliography

 http://www.funtrivia.com/en/subtopics/All-About-Rockets-11349.html

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_big_is_the_world's_largest_rocket_The_world's_largest_rocket_is_large.

 

How big is the largest rocket

January 13, 2011

this doesn't say too much either.